Tips and Tricks – Smokeless

HIGH VELOCITY LOADING

One advantage to reloading is the ability to adjust the load ballistics. This is especially true with today’s powders.

In the past, available reloading powders allowed the velocity of factory ammunition to be obtained. In most cases higher than factory velocity came with the risk of higher pressure. Today there are powders readily available that allow the reloader to exceed “standard” velocity levels by 100 fps to 200 fps. This is a benefit for the varmint hunter and long-range shooter where bullet drop becomes a factor.

Take the venerable 22-250. Historically, this caliber has produced 3,650 fps with a 55-grain bullet. Looking at the Hodgdon Reloading Data Center, there are at least 6 powders that allow this velocity to be increased up to 3,855 fps – just over 200 fps higher.

If you are interested in higher velocity, look at the factory ballistics for the load of interest in your caliber. Then go to the Hodgdon Reloading Data Center and look up the reload data for that caliber and bullet. In many cases, you will find a powder listed which will allow you to safely improve over the factory ballistics.

LOW RECOIL LOADS

One great advantage of handloading is adjusting the ballistics to suite a particular need. Wish you could enjoy that .375 H&H at the range for 50 shots instead of 2 or 3 before the recoil takes its toll? Or how about some extended practice on a plate rack with your “grizzly bear stopper” revolver? The Hodgdon Reloading Data Center has an option to do just this.

Unfortunately, creating a low recoil load is not as simple as just dropping the powder charge. For most cartridge / powder combinations, getting the powder charge low will cause ignition and ballistic problems. Low velocity, low recoil loading is possible, but as always, only with the correct reload data.

Hodgdon has three separate tabs under the DATA menu of the website’s main page to help in low recoil loading.

  • The first is titled “H4895 Reduced Rifle Loads.” H4895 has proven to be a versatile powder that performs superbly at lower powder charges. Loads in this listing are reduced from full power but still offer mid-range performance.
  • If the goal is minimum recoil, the answer is Hodgdon Trail Boss powder. The second tab under the website DATA menu is titled “Trail Boss Reduced Loads.” Trail Boss can be applied to any cartridge you may want to reload. Trail Boss reloads are very mild and easy to shoot. Designed for Cowboy Action Shooting, Trail Boss has proven to be a great way to get more practice with your big bore hunting rifle.
  • Not to leave shotgun shooters out, the third tab under the website’s DATA menu is titled “Reduced Recoil Shotgun Loads.” These loads give enough velocity to break a thrown clay target but take a big bite out of the recoil. Ideal for training, particularly for women and youth shooters, where even a light standard target load can wallop the shoulder hard.
HANDGUN BULLET SHAPE

Although the Hodgdon Reloading Data Center provides the most handloading recipes available, with specific data for many individual bullets, it is impossible to test and list every bullet type that is available. That is why, after selecting the appropriate reload data, it is prudent to check the gun function after making just a few loads rather than just “load ’em up.”

Common issues that may arise include:

  • Fit of cartridge in magazine
  • Bullet nose protrusion past face of cylinder
  • Bullet nose shape does not work with the feed ramp / feeding into the chamber
  • Rifle bullet nose engages the rifling too soon when closing action

Before you load up a box of bullets, make a handful to take on your next trip to the range to ensure they perform as expected. This is much better than having a whole batch of loaded ammo that will not work in your gun.

NSSF AS AN INFORMATION RESOURCE

The NSSF (National Shooting Sports Foundation) is a great information resource. On their website is a library of information on safety, shooting and gun ranges. For the reloader, it is well worth the time to look at some of their safety information, particularly related to reloading components safety and storage.

COMMON METRIC CALIBER RELOAD DATA

You may own or run across a rifle chambered in a common metric caliber. Within the DATA tab of the Hodgdon website, you may find the reload data you are looking for. Look under the heading “Data for Common European Calibers”.

Data for Common European Cartridges

Download the PDF here.

Rifle Data

Caliber Bullet Weight
(grains)
Powder Type Max. Charge Weight
(grains)
Nom. Velocity
5.6mm x50 Magnum 24″ Barrel 40 H4895 29 3630 fps
45
45
H4895
Varget
28.5
30
3550 fps
3550 fps
50
50
H4895
Varget
28
29.5
3500 fps
3500 fps
55
55
H4895
Varget
27
28.5
3300 fps
3300 fps
60 Varget 27.5 3250 fps
70 Varget 26.5 3100 fps
5.6mm x57RWS 26″ Barrel

CAUTION: If reloading old style thick walled brass, reduce these loads by at least 4 grains to avoid dangerous pressures

50
50
50
Varget
H4350
H4831
37
41
46
3700 fps
3700 fps
3700 fps
55
55
55
Varget
H4350
H4831
36
40
45
3550 fps
3550 fps
3550 fps
60
60
60
Varget
H4350
H4831
35
39
44
3450 fps
3450 fps
3450 fps
69/70
69/70
69/70
Varget
H4350
H4831
34
38
43
3300 fps
3300 fps
3300 fps
6.5mm x52 Mannlicher-Carcano 21″ Barrel 85
85
H4895
Varget
34
37
2600 fps
2600 fps
100
100
100
H4895
Varget
H4350
33
35
40
2450 fps
2450 fps
2450 fps
120-125
120-125
120-125
H4895
Varget
H4350
31
33.5
38
2300 fps
2300 fps
2300 fps
129-130
129-130
129-130
H4895
Varget
H4350
30
32.5
37
2250 fps
2250 fps
2250 fps
139-140
139-140
139-140
H4895
Varget
H4350
29
31.5
36
2150 fps
2150 fps
2150 fps
160
160
160
160
H4895
Varget
H4350
H4831
27
29.5
34
39
2000 fps
2000 fps
2000 fps
2086 fps

*This data was developed in the ballistics laboratory of Australia Defence Industries and is presented with permission.
*All loads listed are maximum loads and should not be exceeded. Reduce by 10% for a starting load watching for signs of excess pressure.

 

Caliber Bullet Weight (Grains) Powder Type Max. Charge Weight (Grains) Nom. Velocity
6.5mm x54 (Mannlicher-Shoenauer) 18″ Barrel 100
100
H4895
Varget
38
40
2800 fps
2800 fps
120
120
120
H4895
Varget
H4350
36.5
36.5
42.5
2700 fps
2700 fps
2700 fps
129-130
129-130
129-130
H4895
Varget
H4350
35.5
37.5
41.5
2500 fps
2500 fps
2500 fps
140
140
140
H4895
Varget
H4350
33.5
35.5
41.5
2350 fps
2350 fps
2350 fps
160
160
160
160
H4895
Varget
H4350
H4831
31.5
33.5
37.5
39
2100 fps
2100 fps
2100 fps
2100 fps
6.5mm x53R (Dutch Mannlicher) 25 1.2″ Barrel 120
120
H4895
Varget
33
35
2500 fps
2500 fps
140
140
H4895
Varget
30
32
2200 fps
2200 fps
155
155
H4895
Varget
32
35
2350 fps
2350 fps
160
160
H4895
Varget
31.5
34.5
2350 fps
2350 fps
6.5mm x54 Mauser 20″ Barrel 120-125
120-125
H4895
Varget
33
35
2500 fps
2500 fps
140
140
H4895
Varget
30
32
2200 fps
2200 fps
6.5mm x68 Schuler 25″ Barrel 85
85
H4350
H4831
65
72
3700 fps
3700 fps
100 H4831 70 3550 fps
120 H4831 67 3300 fps
140 H4831 62 3000 fps
7mm x61 Sharp & Hart 24″ Barrel 120
120
120
H4895
Varget
H4350
54.5
57.5
64
3250 fps
3250 fps
3250 fps
139-140
139-140
139-140
H4895
Varget
H4350
53
56
62.5
3100 fps
3100 fps
3100 fps
150
150
150
150
H4895
Varget
H4350
H4831
52
55
61.5
63
3000 fps
3000 fps
3000 fps
3000 fps
160-162
160-162
160-162
160-162
H4895
Varget
H4350
H4831
51
54
60.5
62
2800 fps
2800 fps
2800 fps
2800 fps
175
175
175
Varget
H4350
H4831
52
59
60.5
2700 fps
2700 fos
2700 fps

*This data was developed in the ballistics laboratory of Australia Defence Industries and is presented with permission.
*All loads listed are maximum loads and should not be exceeded. Reduce by 10% for a starting load watching for signs of excess pressure.

 

Caliber Bullet Weight (Grains) Powder Type Max. Charge Weight (Grains) Nom. Velocity
7.35mm Carcano (1938) 21″ Barrel 128
128
128
H4198
H4895
Varget
33
37
41
2500 fps
2500 fps
2500 fps
150
150
H4895
Varget
35
39
2450 fps
2450 fps
310 Cadet (Martini Action) 22″ Barrel Lead 110 H4227 11 1500 fps
120
Jacketed
H4227 9 1270 fps
8mm x68 Schuler 26″ Barrel 125
125
H4350
H4831
73
77
3300 fps
3300 fps
150
150
H4359
H4831
70
75
3100 fps
3100 fps
170
170
H4350
H4831
68
72
2950 fps
2950 fps
220
220
H4350
H4831
62
65.5
2650 fps
2650 fps
9mm x57 Mauser 24″ Barrel 250
250
H4895
Varget
41.5
45
2250 fps
2250 fps
280
280
H4895
Varget
45
49
2100 fps
2100 fps
9.3mm x64 Brennecke 26″ Barrel 231-234
231-234
Varget
H4350
68
73
2700 fps
2700 fps
258
258
Varget
H4350
66.5
70.5
2500 fps
2500 fps
285-286
285-286
Varget
H4350
63
67.5
2300 fps
2300 fps
293
293
293
Varget
H4350
H4831
62
67
61
2250 fps
2250 fps
2250 fps
577/450 Martini Henry 24″ Barrel Lead 400 H4198 37 1300 fps
500 Jeffrey 45″ Barrel 535 H4895 96 2300 fps

*This data was developed in the ballistics laboratory of Australia Defence Industries and is presented with permission.
*All loads listed are maximum loads and should not be exceeded. Reduce by 10% for a starting load watching for signs of excess pressure.

SEMI-AUTO RIFLE FUNCTION

Most of the time handloading is as simple as matching the powder and powder charge to the caliber and bullet. However, when reloading for a gas-operated, semi-auto rifle, another parameter comes into effect – the gas pressure at the operating port.

Generally, this is not an issue when you are reloading within the normal “factory” range for a semi-auto rifle with a proper burn rate powder. When you start moving away from the original design of the cartridge, such as a faster load or heavier bullets or sub-sonic loads, you probably are changing the pressure at the gas port.

The pressure can go higher or lower at the gas port, depending on the load. Remember, port pressure does not necessarily follow velocity. Too low of a port pressure will cause functioning problems – failure to eject the shell case or strip a new cartridge out of the magazine, feeding failures, etc. Too high of a port pressure can also lead to functioning problems, as well as signs of damage to the head from the extractor / bolt.

The only way to know for sure is to load up a handful of cartridges and the next time you head out to the range check for gun function. With a little tweaking, you probably can tailor the performance of the load you want to your individual firearm.

WHAT VELOCITY IS MY HANDLOAD?

Until you understand, it may be confusing to test your handloads on a chronograph and find the velocity is not what you expected based upon the reload data. There are a number of reasons for this. We will attempt to clarify this mystery with the following:

  • Hodgdon reloading data is fired from Industry-Standard Test Barrels
    The test barrel is a precision piece of ballistic equipment. To yield the greatest consistency in data, the test barrel has very precise chamber dimensions and bore dimensions. Your firearm, although a finely crafted machine, is built on a production line where tolerances and tooling wear occur. Not only do different gun types vary in dimensions and tolerances, but even two of the exact same gun model can show dramatic differences in velocity produced.
  • Test barrels generally do not have cylinder gaps
    If you are a revolver shooter, the cylinder gap will cause your velocity measurement to be lower than the reload data due to gas loss in the gap.
  • Test barrels have a fixed length
    In centerfire rifles, the test barrels are all 24-inches long. Your 26-inch varmint rifle will shoot higher velocity, and your 18-inch carbine AR-15 will show lower velocity.
  • Velocity measuring screens are set at an exact distance apart (10 feet) with the center of the screens exactly 15 feet from the muzzle
    Few handload type chronographs have the screens separated apart more than a couple of feet. Generally, at the range, chronograph distance from the muzzle of the gun is not fixed or exact.
  • Muzzle flash and blast can impact the recorded velocity
    Ballistic labs generally protect the screens from muzzle flash and blast.

This does not mean your chronograph setup for measuring handloads is not useful. Just be aware of these factors and establish what level your particular setup is at. One way to help establish where your test setup is shooting is to fire some factory loads and compare your results to the factory published numbers.

COWBOY ACTION LOADS

Ever thought about getting into Cowboy Action shooting? Hodgdon Powder is committed to the Cowboy Action game by providing the widest variety of pistol, rifle and shotshell data in the industry.

There are over 25 cartridges shown (including everything from the .25-20 Winchester, .32-20 Winchester, .38 Long Colt, .44-40 WCF, .44 Russian, .45 Long Colt, .30-30 Winchester, .45-70 Government, to the .50-140 Sharps) and hundreds of recipes especially suited for low velocity lead bullet rifle and pistol loads. Hodgdon also features cowboy shotshell loads with Triple Seven® and Pyrodex® powders.

Hodgdon did find that there are a few things to keep in mind associated with the performance levels required for this sport:

  1. We are asking the cartridge/powder combinations to do things which were never intended in their original design
  2. No single propellant works best for ALL cartridges
  3. Clean loads result from fast burning powder with lower loading densities; better loading density is achieved with slower powders, but they are not as clean

Velocities for all cartridges listed are limited by the SAAMI maximum allowable pressures. Minimum loads are established by pressure.

EXTREME POWDERS

Why did Hodgdon develop the Extreme powders and what are they? Hodgdon knows that long range varmint and big game hunters, along with long range match competitors, are the most demanding shooters. These discriminating shooters encounter instances where temperature conditions play a major role in accuracy.

If a powder varies much in pressure and/or velocity, group size and point of impact can change critically. This is why the Extreme powders were developed. They are not affected by temperature. Whether you are shooting at sub-zero conditions or in the summer desert heat, the velocity of an Extreme powder load shows almost no change. Hodgdon Extreme Extruded propellants demonstrate so little variation in performance from one temperature to the next that the shooter can count on unmatched consistency in point of impact and group size.

Only Extreme powders give you the confidence that your ammunition and gun will shoot to your zero no matter what conditions you are in.

LIGHT RECOIL, SUBSONIC, YOUTH HUNTING, AND INFORMAL TARGET AND PLINKING LOADS

Hodgdon receives a lot of calls from reloaders looking for light recoil, subsonic, youth hunting, or informal target and plinking loads. Hodgdon has developed extensive data just for these applications.

The youth loads developed for hunting approximate pistol velocities in rifles, and therefore, similar performance on game animals. This provides our youth, women, young at heart and beginning shooters with loads effective to 200 yards with minimal recoil. There are several options of Hodgdon powders to choose from include H4895®, Trail Boss®, TightGroup™ and Clays™.

For complete information on the reduced recoil loads in one place, look at the Hodgdon website under the “data” tab.

POWDER FEED TUBE DISCOLORATION

Do you have trouble seeing through your powder measure hopper? Certain smokeless powders, particularly those with high percentages of nitroglycerin, can cause discoloration (yellow-brown-green) in the clear plastic powder measure / hopper tubes. Powder left in the tube over a long period of time makes the discoloration worse.

The easiest way to keep the tube from discoloring is to store your powder in the original container when not loading, instead of leaving it in the tube until the next time you may reload. Normal usage during the reloading process does not provide adequate time for discoloration to occur. So simply draining your hopper into the original powder container when the reloading is completed for the day prevents discoloration of the hopper.

POWDER TUBE STATIC

Depending on the climate you live in, having powder cling (from static) to the inside of the powder hopper / powder measure tube can be annoying. This is especially the case when trying to empty the powder out of the tube.

Fortunately, there is a simple reloading trick for controlling static in your powder tube. Just wipe the inside of tube with a clothes dryer towel (the kind thrown in the dryer with clothes to prevent static). The powder will not stick to the tube with this simple trick.

CHOOSING A POWDER FOR A NEW CARTRIDGE

You just purchased your new hunting rifle in a cartridge where you have no loading experience. What powder do you choose? When you look at reload data, the list of powders is usually long, and any one of them might work great. But here is the trick to hone in quickly on the ones that may work best.

First, choose the bullet for your intended use. Review the reload data to find the velocity level you wish to achieve. As you look at the powder charges, chances are very good one of the powders that meets your velocity criteria shows a “C” beside the maximum charge and/or gives one of the highest velocities. The “C” means a lightly compressed charge of powder. That is an ideal situation, as maximum or near maximum charge weights that yield from 95% to 103% load density tend to give the most uniform velocities, as well as top accuracy.

I’ve yet to see a benchrest shooter whose load does not completely fill the case, as well as give top velocity. The same holds true for a varmint shooter, case full or darn close to it. Along with that particular powder, the powders listed closest to it on either side will likely be in that 95% to 103% range as well. This is a great place to start. Simply start with the beginning load for that combination and carefully work your way into the maximum, at all times watching for case head pressure signs. You can save a lot of shooting by carefully going up in 1/2-grain increments at a time (in mid- to large-capacity cases). Fire only two rounds of each charge level, each pair at a different target. Shoot slow enough to not overheat the barrel. Some of these two-shot groups will show a willingness to group closely. When you find shots that group tightest, load several rounds and then shoot five-shot groups for verification.

I do not have one rifle that doesn’t group the best somewhere near the max load. Should this not provide the accuracy required, either change primer brands and repeat or try one of the powders on either side of the one you just tested. Chances are very good one of these will lead you to a load that meets your expectations.

MAGNUM LOADS IN REVOLVERS

Modern magnum caliber revolvers are high-performance instruments. The high performance has the side effect that the high-pressure gases at the cylinder gap can show signs of erosion on the top strap and the forcing cone. This erosion has different levels of severity based on the type and amount of propellant used in the ammunition.

True magnum loads utilize slow-burning, high-energy propellants, and lots of it. The cylinder gap between the forcing cone of the barrel and the cylinder allows high-intensity, hot-burning gases to escape. More powder, more erosion. Less powder, less erosion. Since this phenomenon cannot be avoided, the shooter can utilize moderate loads of target-type powder for practice to minimize the effects, and use the true magnum propellants when true magnum performance is required. Additionally, newer, high-nitroglycerine-level propellants – designed to yield higher velocities in magnums – create higher flame temperatures, causing erosion a bit sooner than some of the older, single-base propellants.

As the old adage goes, “sometimes you have to give to get.” With that, the amount of increased erosion is small, and over the life of the barrel, insignificant, considering the gain in velocity and performance obtained with these new propellants.

SIMPLE TRICK FOR MONITORING PRESSURE OF YOUR RIFLE RELOADS

One of the first rules of handloading is to always follow the approved reload data. The cautious reloader gradually works up to approved maximum loads to ensure his particular gun does not show pressure signs. Generally this is visual observation of the fired shell case head and primer. There is another slick way to check for pressure signs if you are interested.

Using a blade micrometer that measures in ten thousandths (.0001″), new, unfired cases can be gauged before and after firing to determine reasonably accurate maximum loads. Micrometers measuring in thousandths (.001″) are insufficiently accurate to perform these measurements, and should not be used. Previously fired cases cannot be used accurately due to various levels of brass hardening. Measurement is taken just ahead of the extractor groove on the case head and must be taken at the same place on the case before and after firing. By placing a small mark on the case head – entering the cartridge in the chamber with mark at 12 o’clock – a consistently accurate measurement can be taken with each firing.

Lower pressure rounds, like the .30-30 Winchester, usually yield maximum pressures at .0003″-.0004″ expansion. Modern cartridges, like the .223 Remington, will show maximum pressure at .0004″-.0005″, while .308 Winchester, .270 Winchester, etc., typically yield .0005″-.0006″ expansion at max pressure. Magnums, like the .300 Winchester Magnum, show maximums at .0006”-.0007” expansion, and should be measured on the belt.

In conjunction with these measurements, case head signs of pressure should be monitored as well. These signs include very flat primers, slightly cratered primers, ejector marks on the case head, and stiff extraction. All these case head signs indicate high pressure, and loads should be reduced until these signs disappear.

As always, start with the beginning load listed, and cautiously work up to the maximum shown for that set of components, using the methods listed herein.

SHOTSHELL POWDER APPLICATION IN PISTOL

One of the many benefits of reloading is setting the components and performance of handloaded ammunition based upon individual reloader preference. In many cases, a powder designed for use in shotgun reloading can be used with success in handloading some pistol ammunition.

As always, only data as shown in the Hodgdon Reloading Data Center (RDC) can be used. Hodgdon is aware that some of your favorite shotgun powders can work in pistol loads and data is shown in the RDC. Examples of shotgun powders that have pistol reloading data:

  • Hodgdon Longshot™
  • Hodgdon HS6™
  • Hodgdon Clays™
  • Hodgdon Universal Clays™
  • Hodgdon 700-X
  • Hodgdon PB
  • Hodgdon 800-X
  • Winchester® WST

These powders work best in:

  • .38 Special
  • .45 Auto
  • 9mm Luger
  • .40 S&W
WELCOME TO THE NEW RELOADING DATA CENTER

The Hodgdon Reloading Data Center is new and improved. All the data that you know and love is still here, but now it’s easier to use and accessible on your mobile devices.

We’ve improved the filtering on desktop, allowing you to retrieve data for your materials faster. You can now select multiple options under a cartridge or shell, to quickly compare a couple bullet or shot weights for example. We’ve also broken up the results into easier-to-browse, collapsible groups; no more three hundred row tables.

WHICH DATA DO I USE WHEN MY SPECIFIC BULLET IS NOT LISTED?

Hodgdon Powder Company provides reloading data that covers most bullets available today. However, because there are so many bullet shapes, styles, and construction configurations we cannot create data for every single one. If you cannot find your particular bullet in the reload data there is good news. We provide data in enough variations in most calibers to give you a safe alternative.

Current rifle bullets are constructed with a jacket/lead core or single material (such as all-copper). Bullets with lead cores typically display lower pressures than bullets of all copper or gilding metal structure. As such, we show data for both style bullets in a given weight, as often as possible. For example, should you have a Hornady GMX solid core hunting bullet, but our data for that weight bullet only shows a Speer lead core bullet and a Barnes all copper TSX bullet, use the data for the Barnes bullet. The GMX and TSX bullets being of similar metals and shape, can utilize the same data.

Pistol bullets create the same situation, having even more changes in shape and type. There are lead bullets, copper plated lead bullets, copper-jacketed lead core bullets, and frangible bullets. Frangible bullets are unique such that we always show separate data for them (and recommend not using any other bullet type data).

Lead bullets and copper plated lead bullets yield very similar pressure and velocity results, so when the weights are the same, the same data may be used for each. Jacketed Lead core bullets come in a variety of configurations. Jacketed Hollow points and Jacketed Flat points of the same weight use the same data. Round nosed, lead core, full metal jacketed bullets of the same weight can also use the same data.

In conclusion, bullets with similar shapes and construction materials will utilize the same data. And, above all else, work up your loads by starting with the beginning load and increase charges in small increments, at all times watching for case head pressure signs and stiff extraction.

DO NOT STORE POWDER IN THE RELOADER POWDER MEASURE HOPPER

Powder left in the reloader’s powder measure hoppers for extended periods, overnight or several days, should be avoided. Powder needs to be stored in original containers ONLY, when not in use. Numerous modern smokeless powders are double base in composition, containing both Nitroglycerine and Nitrocellulose. Many powder measures currently available use an inexpensive plastic containing polystyrene, which Nitroglycerine adversely effects when contact is made for extended periods of time, resulting in etching or misshaping the plastic. Normal usage during the reloading process does not provide adequate time for this to occur, so simply draining hoppers into the original containers when the reloading is complete for the day prevents ruining the hoppers.

UNDERSTANDING POWDER EFFICIENCY

When choosing powders with similar burn speed, always look at the efficiency and resulting velocity and pressures while comparing charge weights. A good example is looking at results of new technology Titegroup powder versus old technology powder HP-38.

9mm Luger 125gr SIE FMJ bullet
HP-38 4.8 grs. 1088 fps 28,800 CUP
Titegroup 4.4 grs. 1136 fps 30,600 CUP
38 Special 125 gr. HDY XTP bullet
HP-38 4.9 grs. 934 fps 16,300 CUP
Titegroup 4.6 grs. 1010 fps 15,600 CUP
45 ACP 200 gr. CAST LSWC bullet
HP-38 5.6 grs. 914 fps 16,900 CUP
Titegroup 5.4 grs. 957 fps 16,800 CUP

Titegroup saves money with a lower powder weight per cartridge and yet gets better velocity. Newer technology powders deliver as good or better performance with a net savings in money spent, or allowing you to shoot more for the same money. A Win – Win situation.

DOES SHOOTING A PISTOL CALIBER IN A RIFLE CHANGE THE RELOAD DATA?

You list data for Pistol in my caliber, but I have a rifle chambered for that cartridge. What change in the data is needed shooting a pistol caliber in a rifle?

We often get this question. In asking, the customer is unsure if the different barrel length will necessitate a loading data change in the powder chosen. Let’s preface the answer with a quick guide on testing data.

All our data is tested for Pressure and Velocity with instrumented equipment as established by the Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers Institute (SAAMI). The dimensions of the test equipment are established by SAAMI, both internal (such as chamber) and external such as barrel length. The barrel length is set based upon most popular usage. Rifle calibers are set at 24 inch barrels. Handgun calibers are set based upon the most common use at the time, i.e. a 45 Auto barrel is based upon the barrel length of a 1911, and a 38 Special barrel based upon a standard police issue revolver.

The first thing to remember is that the chamber dimension does not change based upon application. A 223 Remington chamber is the same whether the gun it is in is a handgun or a rifle. The chamber dimension determines the pressure. So, the pressure is the same when fired in that chamber in a rifle or a handgun. The barrel length has no impact on the chamber pressure and hence the reloading data (powder charge and pressure).

The length of the barrel will change the actual velocity you observe. In general as the barrel gets shorter than standard the velocity will lower, and as the barrel gets longer than standard the velocity will increase. This does not change the reload data (powder charge and pressure), just the velocity.

Please note that there is no magic number for how much velocity is lost or gained by changing barrel length. This is because cartridges go from big to small and use varying amounts of different burn speed propellants. The only way to know for sure what the effect is with your different barrel length is to shoot over a chronograph.

So, the quick answer to the question is that the different barrel length will not change the reload data but it will impact the velocity you get.

DOES SHOOTING A RIFLE CALIBER IN A HANDGUN CHANGE THE RELOAD DATA?

We often get this question. In asking, the customer is unsure if the different barrel length will necessitate a loading data change in the powder chosen. Let’s preface the answer with a quick guide on testing data.

All our data is tested for Pressure and Velocity with instrumented equipment as established by the Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers Institute (SAAMI). The dimensions of the test equipment are established by SAAMI, both internal (such as chamber) and external such as barrel length. The barrel length is set based upon most popular usage. Rifle calibers are set at 24 inch barrels. Handgun calibers are set based upon the most common use at the time, i.e. a 45 Auto barrel is based upon the barrel length of a 1911, and a 38 Special barrel based upon a standard police issue revolver.

The first thing to remember is that the chamber dimension does not change based upon application. A 223 Remington chamber is the same whether the gun it is in is a handgun or a rifle. The chamber dimension determines the pressure. So, the pressure is the same when fired in that chamber in a rifle or a handgun. The barrel length has no impact on the chamber pressure and hence the reloading data (powder charge and pressure).

The length of the barrel will change the actual velocity you observe. In general as the barrel gets shorter than standard the velocity will lower, and as the barrel gets longer than standard the velocity will increase. This does not change the reload data (powder charge and pressure), just the velocity.

Please note that there is no magic number for how much velocity is lost or gained by changing barrel length. This is because cartridges go from big to small and use varying amounts of different burn speed propellants. The only way to know for sure what the effect is with your different barrel length is to shoot over a chronograph.

So, the quick answer to the question is that the different barrel length will not change the reload data but it will impact the velocity you get.

DOES MY SHORTER BARRELED RIFLE REQUIRE DIFFERENT RELOAD DATA?

We often get this question. In asking, the customer is unsure if the different barrel length will necessitate a loading data change in the powder chosen. Let’s preface the answer with a quick guide on testing data.

All our data is tested for Pressure and Velocity with instrumented equipment as established by the Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers Institute (SAAMI). The dimensions of the test equipment are established by SAAMI, both internal (such as chamber) and external such as barrel length. The barrel length is set based upon most popular usage. Rifle calibers are set at 24 inch barrels. Handgun calibers are set based upon the most common use at the time, i.e. a 45 Auto barrel is based upon the barrel length of a 1911, and a 38 Special barrel based upon a standard police issue revolver.

The first thing to remember is that the chamber dimension does not change based upon application. A 223 Remington chamber is the same whether the gun it is in is a handgun or a rifle. The chamber dimension determines the pressure. So, the pressure is the same when fired in that chamber in a rifle or a handgun. The barrel length has no impact on the chamber pressure and hence the reloading data (powder charge and pressure).

The length of the barrel will change the actual velocity you observe. In general as the barrel gets shorter than standard the velocity will lower, and as the barrel gets longer than standard the velocity will increase. This does not change the reload data (powder charge and pressure), just the velocity.

Please note that there is no magic number for how much velocity is lost or gained by changing barrel length. This is because cartridges go from big to small and use varying amounts of different burn speed propellants. The only way to know for sure what the effect is with your different barrel length is to shoot over a chronograph.

So, the quick answer to the question is that the different barrel length will not change the reload data but it will impact the velocity you get.

DOES MY SHORT BARRELED CONCEALED CARRY GUN REQUIRE DIFFERENT RELOAD DATA?

We often get this question. In asking, the customer is unsure if the different barrel length will necessitate a loading data change in the powder chosen. Let’s preface the answer with a quick guide on testing data.

All our data is tested for Pressure and Velocity with instrumented equipment as established by the Sporting Arms and Ammunition Manufacturers Institute (SAAMI). The dimensions of the test equipment are established by SAAMI, both internal (such as chamber) and external such as barrel length. The barrel length is set based upon most popular usage. Rifle calibers are set at 24 inch barrels. Handgun calibers are set based upon the most common use at the time, i.e. a 45 Auto barrel is based upon the barrel length of a 1911, and a 38 Special barrel based upon a standard police issue revolver.

The first thing to remember is that the chamber dimension does not change based upon application. A 223 Remington chamber is the same whether the gun it is in is a handgun or a rifle. The chamber dimension determines the pressure. So, the pressure is the same when fired in that chamber in a rifle or a handgun. The barrel length has no impact on the chamber pressure and hence the reloading data (powder charge and pressure).

The length of the barrel will change the actual velocity you observe. In general as the barrel gets shorter than standard the velocity will lower, and as the barrel gets longer than standard the velocity will increase. This does not change the reload data (powder charge and pressure), just the velocity.

Please note that there is no magic number for how much velocity is lost or gained by changing barrel length. This is because cartridges go from big to small and use varying amounts of different burn speed propellants. The only way to know for sure what the effect is with your different barrel length is to shoot over a chronograph.

So, the quick answer to the question is that the different barrel length will not change the reload data but it will impact the velocity you get.

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